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Alan Lewis (BS '72)

I wanted to share the news of the publication of my second book:
"Option Valuation under Stochastic Volatility II: With Mathematica Code".
The book represents a decade-long project and is a sequel to an earlier
book with a similar title. The subject matter is variously called quantitative finance, mathematical finance, or financial engineering.

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Elizabeth McKenney (PhD '95)

Retired from Tridium, Inc. in August 2014. Married Curtis Kiser of Greencastle, PA on January 9, 2016. We are enjoying retired life in Richmond, VA, involved in our church and travelling to performance driving events with the Porsche Club of America and BMW Car Club of America.

http://www.richmond.com/weddings/wedding-announcement/article_3036d1d4-134d-578b-8e33-07d25f387fa5.html

 

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Dana Sadava (BS '03)

Dana Sadava is an opera and orchestra conductor who attributes her love of synthesizing huge amounts of musical information to her training at Caltech! She is the Artistic Director of Pasadena Opera (www.pasadenaopera.org), Music Director of the Community Women's Orchestra, on faculty at the Napa Music Festival, and has also served as conductor and vocal coach with Indianapolis Opera, Pensacola Opera, Banff Opera as Theatre (Canada), and Wexford Festival Opera (Ireland), among others. A pianist by training, she also performs as part of the piano duo Robot Owl with her husband, Jim Stopher.

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Jack Wathey (BS '78)

Life has been good for me and my wife Mary Ann. My career path started in neuroscience, took a sharp turn into computational protein folding, and most recently led me into writing a nonfiction book -- one that had been percolating in my cortex for decades. The title will be "The Illusion of God's Presence: The Biological Origins of Spiritual Longing", coming out in January 2016 from Prometheus Books. I try to interpret the emotional power of religion from the perspective of evolutionary biology. In other news, I just returned from some delightful hikes amid the Bristlecone pines with fellow Techers Larry Mortin, Dave Sivertsen, and Dave's wife Gwyn.

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Samuel Phillips (BS '56, MS '57)

In 2007 we moved from Portola Valley, near Stanford, to Grass Valley in the Gold Country, near children and grandchildren. I continue to consult in product design and manufacturing, often as an expert witness in patents and trade secrets.

News of classmates: Ross Brown, BS56ME, is still running Cryogenic Industries and Cosmodyne, where I worked in the '60s. Hunt Small, BS56ME, and Fritz Trapnell, BS56Ph, have retired from Lockheed and HP/Compaq, respectively. Andre Treyer, MS57ME, our friend from Ecole des Mines, retired from the ball-bearing industry to run a music school near Paris. Other friends: Jack Rocchio, BS55Ph, has retired as a captain for Delta/PanAm in Europe, while from Texas Jim Lewis, BS55ME, consults in liquefied natural gas.

Our professors Jim Davies (history) and J. Kent Clark (English) might have approved of my recent editing of a Civil-War journal ("Torn by War," U. Okla. Press).

I invite my Caltech friends to visit me here in the Sierra foothills.

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David MacDonald (BS '53, MS '54)

Visited daughter Cadie Olsen and family in July, with a camping trip to Idaho. Another upcoming visit with daughter Lara Harshfield and family in Golden, CO.
I'm still hiking and backpacking at age 83, but not climbing fourteeners anymore.
In July, hiked to 10,300-ft elevation near Tuolumne Meadows.
E-address: davenshirley@sbcglobal.net.
 

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Phil Harriman (BS '59)

I retired from the NSF in 2001, but have been taking classes (and occasionally teaching) at nearby Sonoma State University (CA). Next month I'll be teaching a course on "Outstanding Women Scientists of the 20th Century". One of the women I will be talking about is Margaret Burbidge. As an undergraduate physics major (1955-1959) at Caltech I waited tables at the Atheneum for my meals. My attention was drawn to a group of four who often ate lunch together there. I noticed that one of them was a woman. Since there were no female faculty (or undergraduate students) at Caltech at the time she stood out. It turned out the foursome were visiting scientists Margaret and Geoffrey Burbidge and Fred Hoyle, with Caltech professor William Fowler. I later figured out that at the period that they were working on their famous paper nicknamed "B(squared)FH". This paper was the first to show the steps occuring in the interiors of stars that make of all of the atomic nuclei found on earth (the origin of the phrase "We are made of stardust!"). Fowler later received a Nobel Prize for his contributions to this area.

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John Asmus (BS '58, MS '59, PhD '65)

Leonardo da Vinci painted two versions of his most celebrated artworks. These are his Virgin of the Rocks, Virgin and Child, and The Virgin and Child with St. Anne. For centuries there has been speculation concerning the possible existence of a second Mona Lisa, as well. Countless Mona Lisa copies have surfaced and several have been advanced as the long-lost "Second Mona Lisa," only to be dismissed after failing scientific or historical scrutiny. Twenty-seven years ago the heirs of the late Joseph Pulitzer asked me to examine a painting known as the "Isleworth Mona Lisa" in the family collection of fine art. This invitation was extended in response to my ten-year study (instigated by Walter Munk, '48) of the varnishes and pentimenti of the Louvre Mona Lisa. Subsequently, the Isleworth painting has passed every available scientific test from radiocarbon dating to digital-image age regression. I determined that Leonardo painted the Isleworth piece around 1503 and the Louvre portrait around 1513. This discovery settled a protracted debate among art historians as to whether Leonardo painted the Mona Lisa in 1503 or 1513. Both dates are correct, but for two different paintings.
 

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Ronald Carson (BS '76)

After 27 years at Boeing I retired as a Technical Fellow in Systems Engineering. During that time I worked on commercial and military airplanes, satellite communications (five patents), and developed methods for requirements engineering (two patents).

I now teach part-time for Seattle Pacific University (undergraduate Engineering) and Missouri University of Science & Technology (graduate Systems Engineering). It was great to reconnect with Steve Mitchell (BS 77) through the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE). I continue to be active in INCOSE as a Fellow, certified Expert Systems Engineering Professional (ESEP), and member of the measurement working group.

Retirement provides more time for travel with my wife, Merrie, D.Min. and pastor, and visiting with four children and a growing number of grandchildren (six and counting) in the Seattle, WA area.

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Lee Molho (BS '63)

"Inside the Great Rose Bowl Hoax", my memoir about our 1961 prank, was published on Amazon Kindle. It includes photos I took while we did the prank and the newly rediscovered original Kodachrome image that is now in the Caltech Archives (and on posters and mugs in the Bookstore.) All proceeds go to undergraduate financial aid. I would love to hear from Lloydies with recollections to add to the prank's permanent home in the Archives.

[Note to editor: I tried to upload a large book cover image but it was too much for the form, so I have attached a thumbnail. Glad to provide a large image with permission to use in whatever pixel dimensions you wish.]

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