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David Bryant (BS '73)

After living and working in Denver, Colorado for 38 years, Kathryn and I have retired to the Texas Hill country, where I remain active in the local community as a volunteer with the AARP TaxAide program and for the local public library, and Kathryn stays busy with the Native Plant Society of Texas. I still hear from a few Lloydies now and again.

If you're ever in the vicinity of Canyon Lake and want to get together to reminisce about shared experiences at Caltech, feel free to contact me: davidbryant (at) att.net.

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Deborah Chung (BS '73, MS '73)

In spite of its explosive market growth, 3D metal printing is challenged by the thermal stress resulting from the high printing temperatures and the layer-by-layer nature of the printing. The stress commonly results in warpage and inadequate bonding between the layers. Therefore, real- time monitoring of the printing is greatly needed to provide better control and a record of the printing. Cameras commonly used for the monitoring is inadequate for looking at the interface between the layers.  A new invention by Professor Deborah D.L. Chung of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, is about to transform the monitoring technology. This invention unprecedentedly provides monitoring without using any sensor, as the printed layers sense themselves.

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Pierre Jungels (PhD '73)

After Caltech, I worked more than 40 years in the international Oil and gas business mostly in Exploration and production of which more than 25 years at main Board of Directors level.
I was a Director of Baker Hughes Inc. until July this year where BHI merged with GE Oil and Gas.
I am Chairman of Velocys Plc. a technology business merging the micro channels reactor technology of Battle with hyper active catalysts from Oxford University.
This allows small scale GTL ( Fischer Tropch ) to be economical and allows small scale renewable production of Jet Fuels and Diesel from non recyclable waste or woody by products.

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John Cummings (BS '69, MS '70, PhD '73)

I left Caltech and joined TRW in 1973.  In 1975 I was hired by Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, NM. I worked at Sandia for 32 years in several R&D and management positions. One of my more interesting Sandia assignments was serving in Washington DC as the Director of Critical Infrastructure Protection for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science & Technology division (2003-2005). I retired from Sandia in 2008. My wife Ellen and I split our time between WA and CO because our 2 sons and their families (8 grandkids) live in those 2 states. In addition to spending lots of time with our extended family, we also do volunteer work and are active in our church.

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Robert Geller (BS '73, MS 75', PhD '77)

I was the first permanent foreign faculty member at the University of Tokyo, and after 32 years of research and teaching in seismology here I will be retiring at the mandatory retirement age, 65. I will continue to live in Tokyo and also will continue my research on inverting seismic data for 3-D earth structure and various other topics I'm working on now, including the problems and limitations of methods now being used for various types of earthquake forecasting.

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Yorkman Lowe (EX '72, BS '73)

Being retired, I've volunteered for historical and architectural societies, helping at public exhibits and home tours. Also for the Multiple Sclerosis Society's annual bike rides between SF & Sonoma County. In summer 2015 I began volunteering as a National Parks Service tour guide on the Amtrak trains between San Jose and San Luis Obispo. That year I made 6 roundtrips, and in 2016, 10 roundtrips. If the trains are on time, it's an 11-hour day; if not, it's longer. See:
https://www.nps.gov/subjects/amtraktrailsandrails/index.htm

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Douglas Duncan (BS '73)

At the Univ. of Colorado we have just built the most advanced planetarium ever built in the US. It features a video image of 8,000 x 8,0000 pixels, 60 frames per second. That's a lot of data! We can show the earth at 1 m per pixel and fly around, fly through the solar system, out to the edge of the known universe. We're starting to make productions for distribution to the more than 1,000 digital video planetariums in the US. Now I'm looking for individual and corporate sponsors. Kind of combining Caltech and Hollywoood.

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